Known as “Asian spinach,” this mild mustard green is actually related to brassicas such as broccoli and cabbage. With its rounded spoon-like shape, firm texture, and sweet, buttery taste, it is an incredibly versatile green that adds flavor dimension wherever it appears.

Tatsoi

SEASONAL in Southern California

History

While native to China, tatsoi has been primarily cultivated in Japan since 500 A.D., where it is known as tasai.

Nutrition

Tatsoi is high in vitamins A, C, and K, and is a good source of potassium, calcium, iron, beta-carotene and phosphorus.

Storage

Wash tatsoi leaves well and let dry thoroughly, then pack loosely in a plastic bag with a paper towel added to absorb moisture. Tatsoi will keep for 3 to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Preparation

Tatsoi can easily be used in place of spinach in any recipe, but it is particularly useful as a cooling counterbalance to spicy dishes. Serve alongside miso-glazed seafood or spicy barbecue, stir into noodle dishes or risotto, or toss with crispy tofu and a warm dressing. Use in place of spinach or lettuce on sandwiches, bagels, and salads, or saute simply with sesame oil, soy and mirin.

Cooking

Combine tatsoi leaves with roasted green beans and sweet potatoes, crispy tofu, fresh avocado chunks, and cooked rice noodles. Drizzle with sesame oil and soy, and serve hot or cold, topped with toasted sesame seeds. Despite its spinach-like appearance, tatsoi brings an array of subtle flavor notes, including spicy, tangy, nutty, and earthy.

Pro Tips

Despite its spinach-like appearance, tatsoi brings an array of subtle flavor notes, including spicy, tangy, nutty, and earthy.

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